Training for Long-Term Care Volunteers Goes Online!

I am thrilled to announce that “Volunteering in Long-Term Communities” volunteer training is now available online!

My experience…

Over the years, I’ve had the extreme pleasure of training hundreds of volunteers in person, but what always lingered in the back of my mind was the question of reaching a wider audience. There are some 15,000 nursing homes in the United States, and many of them cannot afford to hire a dedicated volunteer manager, and if they do have a volunteer manager, it is likely someone splitting their time between activities and managing the volunteers. As a result, training the volunteers may  be limited by time and availability of the “trainer.”

My volunteer management experience taught me early on that managing volunteers is not a part-time job. It requires the volunteer manager to not only work hard to recruit volunteers, but it also includes providing meaningful training so that the volunteer feels prepared and is useful in their role.

Volunteers want training…

Volunteer training does not or should not stop after the initial orientation so providing ongoing training is essential for the volunteer to grow in their position. Research shows that volunteers want ongoing training. And finally, the volunteer manager must work to stabilize the volunteer force by putting processes in place that promote volunteer retention.

While I cannot solve the challenges of funding and time, I can develop volunteer training programs specifically designed for people volunteering in nursing homes and make them accessible to everyone and in their own time.  This makes the online training platform extremely valuable to volunteer managers and well as the volunteers.

From my experience in instructional design and teaching online gerontology courses, I have learned what people are looking for in an online course. Those same principles come into play as I design courses for the long-term care volunteer. The training should be “lean and deep,” meaning that the training material is presented in clear and understandable language using various learning styles and that it should be interactive to keep the “trainee” engaged and moving forward.

Online training…

In this new course, there are eight modules. The first module opens by giving context to the volunteer experience presenting the changes that are taking place in our population, i.e., that the number of people 65 years of age and older is exploding.  I want the volunteer to understand the magnitude of the need and statistics associated with the people they will be meeting.

However, I’m careful not to paint a “doom and gloom” picture as some do. Instead, volunteering is an opportunity for the community to become more deeply involved in the life of the nursing home to not only enhance “person-centered” care but to learn first-hand about career opportunities.

From there, the next module deals with ageism and the negative stereotypes that influence the way we view aging and older adults. For me, this is an exciting topic because by the end of this module the volunteer realizes that living in the nursing home is far more than just a “waiting to die” station but instead there is the opportunity for learning and personal growth.

The remaining modules present the various functions of a nursing home and levels of care, communications both verbal and non-verbal and of course, HIPAA, Resident Rights and most important what “person-centered” care really means and how the volunteer can support staff in the delivery of that level of care.

Next steps…

If you oversee the volunteer program at your nursing home then, please consider taking advantage of this online training by encouraging your current volunteers and new volunteers to take this course. Doing so will give them in-depth insight into the aging process and offer them new ideas for creating personalized activities for the people living in your community.

If you are someone that has been thinking about volunteering in a nursing home, this course will give you a solid foundation from which you can rely on and grow in during your volunteer experience.

There is nothing more damaging to a volunteer program than to launch people into a volunteer experience unprepared. More often than not, the volunteers become discouraged and likely do not return while you end up with a “revolving door” volunteer program.

Volunteers, adequately trained, stay on the job adding real value to your long-term care community. However, they need critical insight and tools for that to happen. The learning platform I’m using is user-friendly and is accessible either on your computer or mobile device. The modules are easy to navigate and follow a logical progression, building on upon the other.

Please share this article with the people you know that would appreciate having this resource available to them.  If you have questions about the training, feel free to contact me and I would be glad to talk to you.

 

Volunteer Programs and Your Public Image

female volunteer with older woman
Volunteers change persceptions…

Perceptions are everything. From my earliest days of military training to the present, I have been taught and now am teaching my own students and volunteers that perceptions powerfully influence the way people think and react.  This holds true for nursing homes as well. Recruiting volunteers is challenging particularly when it comes to recruiting volunteers for nursing homes.

Several common questions I am asked by people I approach, “Will I get sick?” or “Are they kinda of senile?” reveals the perceptions people harbor when they think about nursing homes. They might think nursing homes are depressing, that people won’t even know I am there, I will get sick from being around the residents, it’s just a place where people are waiting to die.  What people perceive becomes reality for them.

Poor public perception negatively impacts the quality of care as it leads to inadequate staffing and high turnover rates that can reach 100%, (Leadership Council of Aging Organizations, 2007). This means turning staff over every year! Imagine running a business having to hire and train new staff every year!

Volunteers can correct faulty perceptions of nursing homes.  The volunteer becomes the bridge between the local nursing home and the community. The volunteer visits the nursing home befriending residents and staff.  During their visits they are likely to encounter care staff who are highly committed and passionate about the care they provide and likely to encounter, what I like to call, “a living history book,” that is an older person with a life time of experiences to share.

Afterwards, the volunteer returns to their community sharing with their friends, neighbors, co-workers and others the marvelous stories, expressions of love and caring, and the deep need we all carry for relationships. The volunteer becomes the vehicle to correct the wrong-thinking and negative perceptions.  One volunteer observed,

“I went in to dazzle them, but instead they dazzeled me.”

     I am always looking for new volunteers, bridge-builders if you will allow me the metaphor.  I am passionate about volunteers, recruiting them, training them and then having become a viable part of the care team.  Among the many great benefits of the volunteer, is that they will become a positive image builder between your facility and the community.

Please  contact me to learn more about volunteer training programs and what I can do to help you enhance your volunteer program.

How do you recruit 800 volunteers?

art group in tawa

As you know, VolunCheerLeader  is on a quest to identify and highlight outstanding volunteer programs.  My journey is taking to me many different places to include Auckland, New Zealand.  Recently, while explaining my mission to someone they immediately piped up and said, “You have to meet Jill Woodward, CEO of Elizabeth Knox Nursing Home and Hospital.  After a series of emails, we scheduled a telephone call (Skype) and to no real surprise to me, the person who answered the call, Jill, was obviously full of passion, high energy and expert in her work.  I spent about an hour talking with her.  Later, I had the pleasure of meeting the Kristen O’Reilly, newly appointed to head Community Partnerships. Kristen was originally hired to develop the volunteer program for Knox.  Here are excerpts from my communications with them.  Read more…